United States

The United States of America is one of the focus countries in the Netherlands’ International cultural policy. Its scale, culture and leading global position make the country attractive for Dutch culture makers from all genres and disciplines, like visual artists, filmmakers, musicians or DJs. More than 2,000 Dutch cultural activities take place each year in the U.S., which makes it the number one export country outside of Europe for Dutch arts and culture.

Regional dispersion Success for Dutch artists in the United States frequently leads to follow-ups in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the world. Traditionally, many Dutch cultural projects in the U.S. take place in the New York City metropolitan area, followed by larger cities such as Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, and Miami. To make it in New York, artists need to have a professional track record. The international cultural policy and the Consulate General of the Netherlands focuses on these cities, but also strives for a national approach, and gives special attention to secondary and upcoming cities in the U.S. with growing art centers and important venues. This includes, but is not limited to, cities such as Atlanta, Austin, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh.

Policy framework DutchCulture works to help implement the International Cultural Policy of the Netherlands as set up by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The goals for the 2017-2020 period are set as follows:

* The international exchange of Dutch art, makers and knowledge between the Netherlands and the U.S. leads to a qualitative growth;

* Dutch shared cultural heritage in the U.S. will be better managed, preserved and unlocked for Dutch and American audiences;

* The working area (market) and the quality of the network of Dutch art institutions, artists and designers are expanded in the U.S.;

* The collaboration between Dutch talent and American institutions leads to a qualitative growth of the participants;

* The visibility and appreciation of Dutch art and culture in the U.S. remains at a high level or is increased.

Special focus program 2019: Never Grow Up! Dutch film, literature and performing arts for young audiences Throughout 2019, Never Grow Up! presents an abundance of Dutch film, literature and performing arts for young audiences in the United States, that caters to young audiences and families. A wide range of work from the Netherlands will be presented at events and venues such as IPAY Showcase, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Kennedy Center, New York International Children’s Film Festival and Brooklyn Book Festival. Presenters and agencies are invited to attend screenings, readings and performances, meet directors, writers and performers, and engage with representatives of Dutch expert organizations to discuss opportunities for collaboration and exchange. Never Grow Up! is a joint effort with Dutch Performing Arts, the Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in New York, Eye International, Netherlands Film Fund, Cinekid and Dutch Foundation for Literature. Dutch film, literature.

Shared past, shared future  The shared heritage between the Netherlands and the United States goes back 400 years. Cultural exchange between the two countries has always been important, and the Dutch government has strategically invested in it for the past 25 years. The Consulate General in New York (CGNY) works closely together with the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, the National Archives of the Netherlands, and DutchCulture for the knowledge exchange, preservation and education around our shared heritage.

Partners To stimulate the Dutch presence in the United States, the following organisations work together: the Dutch Consulate General in New York, the Mondriaan Fund, Dutch Performing Arts, the Dutch Foundation for Literature, the Creative Industries Fund NL, Het Nieuwe Instituut, the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, the National Archives of the Netherlands, the Netherlands Film Fund, the EYE Film Institute, and DutchCulture.

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United States at a glance

2374 registered activities in 2018
featuring 717 artists

Number of activities
12 months (2018)

Activities by
discipline in 2018



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Frequently Asked Questions


1. Where can I find funding within the Netherlands?

In the Netherlands the means for international cultural cooperation are delegated to the national funds. The fund that works for your art form or discipline, has one or several subsidy programs for internationalisation. To make sure the program fits with your project before starting the process of application, you can contact the advisors of the fund. The funds are: 

Creative Industries Fund NL (Design, Creative Industries, Architecture, Digital)        

Mondriaan Fund (Visual Arts, modern art, design)

Performing Arts Fund (Performing Arts; theater, dance, music, opera)

Dutch Film Fund (Audiovisual media, film, documentary)      

Dutch Foundation for Literature (Literature)                                                        

Cultural Participation Fund (Communal arts, cooperation, projects with non-professionals)

(specifically for Germany)

Netherlands Enterprise Agency (Creative Industries)

 

More information: Cultural Mobility Funding Guide for the Netherlands 2019/2020:

In this mapping made by DutchCulture you will find a landscape of specific funding options within the Netherlands, for example regional funding. 

2. Where can I find funding within the United States?

In the United States art and culture are barely supported financially on a federal level. This means that the opportunities for funding in the United States are very different from for example the Netherlands. In the US it is essential to find private funding. The Dutch embassy in Washington and the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York, work demand oriented. This means that foremost they will work together with American organisations or institutes and are focussed on their applications for support. As a Dutch organisation it is therefore important to find an American partner. There is also a foundation that aims to support Dutch-American exchange and that supports small to midlevel projects, the Netherlands America Foundation. Furthermore DutchCulture has contributed to funding guideluines that can help you find your way in the landscape of private funding in the USA. Think also about contacting local societies or clubs that have something in common with your project, to get more fundraising. For example, when you perform concerts of Bach, find a ‘Friends of Bach’ society.

Netherlands America Foundation

On the Move                                                                                                                                                            

Cultural Mobility

3. What are the most important regions and cities?

The international cultural policy in the United States focusses on cities, more so then states. The United States of America are obviously a very large and diverse landscape, and it is not possible with the means at hand to include every region. Therefore we choose cities that have a dense cultural landscape with many cultural venues, and that demonstrate a big interest in Dutch arts and culture. The main cities of interest are (in order of importance) New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Detroit, Miami, Houston, Austin. In the field of Shared Cultural Heritage the focus is on New York City and State, because of the well-known New Amsterdam legacy. The ‘Midwest’, mainly Michigan, and Illinois are places of interest to develop further relations with in this area. For the other disciplines the regional focus differs, and depends largely on the main fairs and events that cause a density of Dutch events each year; like South by South West in Austin, Art Basel in Miami, or New York Design.

4. How can I promote my work in the United States?

It is a good idea to engage local publicists, that have an understanding of your art discipline, audience and region. It would also be wise to engage a professional translator for your promotion materials in English, in order to use the right language that  Communication with websites or social media that could promote your project, will also be better received if written in German, the same goes for local press. There are a growing number of Dutch people living in Germany and many cities have a Dutch network. Using these existing networks will also help you to promote your work.

Make sure to contact the embassy or the consulates to let them know about your projects, and don’t forget to let DutchCulture know! This way you will be included in our database and become part of our network.5. \

5. What can the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York do for me?

The Consulate General serves as an intermediary between the Dutch and American art worlds, by promoting Dutch arts, culture and shared cultural heritage in the U.S., and by encouraging and facilitating cultural cooperation and exchange. More specifically, the work can be described as follows:

* The Consulate General informs American cultural institutions and professionals about Dutch cultural activities in the U.S. and developments in the Dutch art and cultural world

* The Consulate General informs Dutch cultural professionals and institutions (in particular the government agencies, cultural funds, and national institutes) about developments in the American art and cultural world

* The Consulate General advises American cultural professionals and institutions who wish to program Dutch art and cultural activities and projects, and point the way towards Dutch funding opportunities

* The Consulate General advises the Dutch government and cultural funds regarding the quality of American venues

* The Consulate General provides networking opportunities for Dutch art professionals and the American counterparts

* The Consulate General provides limited amounts of funding for qualified Dutch cultural projects in the U.S.

 

What The Consulate General of the Netherlands Doesn’t Do

* The Consulate General does not organize any projects itself, including, but not limited to: exhibitions, concerts, performances, lectures, screenings, etc.

* The Consulate General cannot support Dutch organizations seeking support for projects in the U.S. that do not have an American host or co-organizing partner

* The Consulate General cannot act as agents for Dutch individuals in the U.S.

* The Consulate General does not support amateur projects and activities.

 

For more information please visit the website of the Consulate General, conveniently named DutchCultureUSA 

6. Which Visa do I need?

Acquiring the right visa for working in the United States, is a complex business. For working on cultural projects it has not been made easier in the past years. If you are only travelling to the US for a short visit or business trip, to meet up with partners or prepare a project, a ESTA visa is usually enough. You can obtain one through the Waiver Program.

As soon as you start working though; exhibiting and selling art, screening a movie, participating on a fair or going on tour, you will need to get a work permit. There are different permits and it might take some time to apply for. For more information you can contact the mobility team of DutchCulture.

If you need help applying for a visa, you are often facing high legal costs. The non-profit legal organisation Tamizdat offers performers and artistic organisations help, they can also function as your petitioner if needed.

7. How can I find a residency, stage to perform, exhibition space?

Through the DutchCulture Database you can figure out which artists from the Netherlands have worked at which venues, and start your research there. Go the the search icon on the upperleft corner of the website, and search by discipline, country and city.

For residencies the organisation Transartists, which is also a part of DutchCulture, can help you a long way. In order to successfully build an international career, and in order to find sustainable partners in a country, it always wise to spend more than a few days somewhere. Residencies, that can last from a couple of weeks until several months,  can help you achieve that.  

8. What is the Shared Cultural Heritage Program and Matching Fund?

Projects that focus on shared cultural heritage between the Netherlands and the United States, and that help enhance visibility of this heritage, are applicable for the Matching Fund. Dutch Culture oversees this fund and discusses the applicants with a group of Shared Heritage experts, the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands and the diplomatic posts. For more information you can contact the advisor for the United States. Conditions for receiving support through this fund is to have at least one American partner, that the project will reach a broad public, and that it will enhance visibility of the shared heritage.

9. How can I keep up to date with any news concerning cultural work in the US?

You can follow DutchCulture on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. You can also subsribe to our Newsletter here, and even specify which content and country you are interested in. 

The Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York also manages a Facebook page, a Twitter page, and an Instagram page, which you can find conveniently under DutchCultureUSA. If you have a Dutch project in the U.S. that you would like us to feature, please send materials (text and copyright free hi-res images with proper acknowledgement and credit info) to dutchcultureusa@gmail.com for the Consulate General and r.ebbers@dutchculture.nl for DutchCulture. 

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Activities

1 - 18 of 5741 activities
MusicConcert
Improvs with Lou Mallozzi and Ken Vandermark
Chicago, United States

21 Nov 2019

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